PBS: “Slavery By Another Name” premieres February 13th

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From Letters of Note: To My Old Master

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From Letters of Note: To My Old Master

In August of 1865, a Colonel P.H. Anderson of Big Spring, Tennessee, wrote to his former slave, Jourdon Anderson, and requested that he come back to work on his farm. Jourdon — who, since being emancipated, had moved to Ohio, found paid work, and was now supporting his family — responded spectacularly by way of the letter seen below (a letter which, according to newspapers at the time, he dictated). Rather than quote the numerous highlights in this letter, I’ll simply leave you to enjoy it. Do make sure you read to the end.

– From Letters of Note.com

From Property to People: Why You Need to Answer the Census

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In watching Dr. Henry Louis Gates PBS series’ “Faces of America”, I see Dr. Gates reiterate to his guests that they have a luxury of tracing back their family roots to their native lands and ancestry with DNA and historic records. I wonder if they actually understand what that means for them, and what that means for those who have to refer to property logs to get some sort of idea of where their beginning in America started, and where connection to their ancestry somewhat ended.

Out of the legacy of the event of Juneteenth, our people were recognized for what we truly were: people. A people who out of strong adversity and turmoil, contributed to the infrastructure we know and live in today. We fought in the wars, We built “the house”, We managed the land, We birthed the music, We broke the barriers, We enforced the rules, and it is important to let America know: We’re still here.

But why We as a people, want to deny ourselves our rights to what We set the standards for is beyond me. I imagine if you are reading this and are living in America, you are a taxpayer. Whether all you’ve done today was buy a soda, turn on the television, or text a friend, you’ve paid a tax to do so.  While your buying patterns and income level are all that matter to most, how you are surviving in this community of America is what matters most in the Census. It’s what matters to those who specifically seek out to serve you.

We need to know how all the numbers of blacks removed from New Orleans are surviving. Is Atlanta still feasible for young black professionals compared to Washington, D.C.? Is North Carolina where a woman should still seek their eligible male counterparts? How many schools that have been shut down this year, need to be reconsidered in the streets of Kansas City and Chicago? Should you go to Los Angeles, Miami or New York to become the budding multi-talented professional you so desire to be, and still be able to have the resources to survive? These questions and more are answered with the 10 questions you are asked to answer.

10 anonymous questions can hardly describe all my business, but it can affect the way I handle my business in the future. Answer your 10 and send it in.

From U.S. Census Website: